Not Paying Us November Salaries, against the Law – CETAG to Gov’t

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The Colleges of Education Teachers Association of Ghana (CETAG) has described as “illegal and illegitimate” government’s directive not to pay November salaries of its striking members.

The  National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE)  had directed all principals of public colleges of education not to validate the November salaries of the teachers who were said to be on an “unwarranted and illegal” strike action since October 29.

But CETAG disagrees with the stance of government, questioning the capacity of the NTCE to declare their strike illegal

“The directive by NCTE to Principals not to validate us falls flat in the face of the law, as they have no such mandate enshrined in Act 454 that establishes the NCTE,” CETAG said in a statement issued Monday.

According the Association, it is only the National Labour Commission (NLC) that has the capacity to declare their strike action illegal.

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“As at now, the NLC has not pronounced our strike illegal and communicated same to us in writing,” CETAG stated.

CETAG maintains that the decision by NCTE to instruct principals not to validate its members is “illegal and illegitimate” and calculated at coercing its members into submission but noted they will stand their grounds.

While disagreeing with government’s directive, the Association says there is evidence to show it has followed all due processes leading to their strike.

It also noted it is interesting that the government is accusing its members of stampeding the efforts of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations (MELR) to resolve the impasse by constituting a committee.

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In CETAG’s view, the proposed seven-member committee which the Ministry proposed to negotiate their salaries “does not have the legal mandate to negotiate for salaries and in our view, the best they could do is to advise government”



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